Critical Theory Now

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Tyson creates a clear but comprehensive guide to a beginners look at the theories, but the book is also helpful for more in depth knowledge as I learnt things I didn't know previously about theories. I also liked The Great Gatsby critical readings as not only could you see how the readings were very different b I was reading this book aspartame of my uni course, I gave read most of the theories except one or two. I also liked The Great Gatsby critical readings as not only could you see how the readings were very different but get an idea of how to put them into practice for yourself.

Sep 26, Scott rated it liked it Shelves: theory. This book basically takes the complex jargon of theorists and puts it in exceptionally easy terms. It is almost disappointingly easy, in the sense that you lose the style of the original theorists. Still, it's helpful for overarching concepts and terms. At the end of each section, Tyson uses the theory discussed in that chapter in an essay on The Great Gatsby, allowing one to see the theory applied. View 1 comment.

Mar 29, Anne-Marie rated it it was amazing Shelves: education. Each theory is explained clearly, has discussion questions, and short essay interpreting Great Gatsby through that theory lens.

The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Theory

Sep 01, Erika Schoeps rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-for-school. One of my favorite textbooks ever, and probably one of the reasons I changed my major from "Professional Writing" to "Literature. Although this book feels conversational and casual, it never stumbles into the realm of patronizing. Sometimes, even though this book was quite casual, I feel as if the author was being unnecessarily wordy.

I would sometimes stop and try to rephrase a sentence to be far simpler, and One of my favorite textbooks ever, and probably one of the reasons I changed my major from "Professional Writing" to "Literature. I would sometimes stop and try to rephrase a sentence to be far simpler, and could usually do it with no problem.

The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Theory | SpringerLink

I'm planning on buying this book in the future, its a gem and an absolutely necessary resource for every English major out there. Jan 20, Christopher added it. The chapter on deconstruction is what first attracted me to this book, but I ended up reading the whole thing. Tyson's reader is an ambitious project aimed at "enlarg ing our understanding not only of literary works I would say that Tyson succeeded in doing this for me, especially since her book is very different from the kinds I typically read.

Mar 12, Rubab rated it it was amazing. Idk, I'm just overwhelmed by the amount of information I've just read. We read this text for one of my classes this semester, and I found it so helpful! It explained each technique in a thought out and organized way, and kept it easy to follow so you consistently understood what it was trying to teach!

One of the only text books I enjoyed this semester haha. It's only now that I understand what Harold Bloom means from calling some modern schools of literary criticism, "school of resentment. Summing all these readings up one may conclude Fitzgerald's masterwork is a racist, sexist, classist, colonialist!

Aug 29, Sarah rated it liked it. Tyson's introduction to critical theory is very useful. She provides excellent overviews of the types of theories popular in English studies today, and she does a good job of showing the strong and weak points of each. The text is quite readable and well-written, though it does become repetitive at times.

Blog Post: Has Critical Theory Run Out of Time for Data-Driven Scholarship? | Gary Hall

Each chapter includes a reading of The Great Gatsby in the style of the theory she has discussed. Aug 06, Negar rated it it was amazing. A great start for all Eng Lit students.

May 19, Mary rated it it was amazing. Easy to read and well written with a good layout- All I ask for in a theory book. Sep 23, Millie Muroi rated it it was amazing Shelves: english-lit , non-fiction. One of my Literature teachers recommended this book to us a while back at a PACES program and I've been slowly getting through it over the course of the year. This is by far the best Literature theory book I've read though my readings in that realm are still rather narrow. Lois Tyson is thorough in her explanations and citations, yet so adept as to what information she should provide and how it is provided to the reader in order to maintain explanations that are clear and concise.


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I loved he One of my Literature teachers recommended this book to us a while back at a PACES program and I've been slowly getting through it over the course of the year. I loved her application of each literary theory to The Great Gatsby at the end of each chapter; readings which are insightful, engaging, and elucidate each theory so well.

I didn't think I could love English Lit much more than I already do, but Tyson has shattered that belief for me and I absolutely cannot wait to continue studying Literature! Jul 25, Mar rated it liked it. She outlines the history and main characteristics well. She uses Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby to illustrate each theory and has application questions for short stories and poems at the end of each chapter. Many of these works are "classics" but it allows for access to examples and potentially a familiarity with the works she addre 3.

Many of these works are "classics" but it allows for access to examples and potentially a familiarity with the works she addresses. Nov 20, Sabrina Williams rated it liked it. I had to read this book for my class on Literary Theory. The book did a good job at presenting each theory in a semi-simple way. From the outside, it was an impressive roster for a relatively small department. I was eager to offer any and all of these courses.

But by the end of my first year teaching at Loyola, I had made a motion to my department to get rid of the theory requirement for our majors. We scrapped the semiotics course from our course listing. I still teach a course called Interpretive Approaches, which gives students exposure to theory from Marx and Freud up through poststructuralism, postcolonialism and queer theory. So why then did I get rid of the theory requirement in my department? In short, I felt that theory had become something akin to an elite club -- which went entirely against the critical impulse of what was best about theory.

Not only that, the elite club had splintered and had become multiple factions constantly trying to one-up the others in terms of who had the master concept, the code to ideology, the key to subjectivity. In seminars and at conferences, I saw peers and mentors alike bullied or sneered at for uttering an out-of-fashion phrase or citing an obsolete thinker. With a few exceptions, professional associations and journals balkanized and refused to converse with one another. Theory had started to reproduce the very patterns and habits that it was supposed to help us think about and change.

I want to be careful here to not sound anti-intellectual or hostile to the kind of scholarship, writing and teaching that -- when done with care and sincere interest in the world -- goes by the name critical theory. My own experiences with critical theory started in two energetic college seminars: one on 20th-century continental philosophy and another on Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. As I made my way through two graduate programs, my interest in critical theory both broadened and was focused, and most of my encounters with this heterogeneous area of inquiry were positive and generative.

I funneled epiphanies and obscure findings into my own writing, and I used snippets of theory in the undergraduate classes I taught. I could tell that some of my peers were not enamored with reading or writing about theory, often because they detected the rhetorical power plays at work.

radcphykali.ml But by and large, my graduate seminars in theory were scintillating and creatively inspiring, cumulatively giving me the confidence to write a dissertation and teach imaginative courses. And the mentors who taught those graduate seminars were wonderful people, supportive and grounded. That said, I also heard horror stories from friends in other departments or at other universities, and I was privy to dramas and infighting that made me realize that theory was far from an innocent, much less heroic, intellectual pursuit.

By the time I finished my Ph. I was beyond excited to have landed a job where I could teach theory but equally alert to the ways that it could go wrong. And for good reason: what often seems to academics to be the most incisive and nuanced explanation of something all too often ends up sounding like gobbledygook to the general reader.

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Neologisms can be useful, and even playful and mind expanding. But jargon-filled prose -- the writing of it, the adoration of it -- does a disservice to everyone involved. Ugh, here comes the Sokal affair, back to rear its ugly head.


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If my students wanted to spend 75 minutes discussing Julia Kristeva or Jacques Derrida, great -- I was all on board. Something myopic, and something that can become toxic when taken too self-seriously.